Practical Guide of Physical Education – Georges Hébert

Below is a download link to a partially translated text from Georges Hébert (written in 1912).

Practical Guide of Physical Education – Georges Hébert

I had previously seen an abbreviated version of this translation (hosted at americanparkour.com), but the above listed link includes much more detail.

If you are not familiar with Georges Hébert, you may wish to review the following:

Georges Hébert – Wikipedia

Ironically, what is demonstrated in his 1912 text is well beyond what many healthy adults are capable of performing 100 years later. Many of the so-called advancements that are espoused today are nothing more than attempts at quietly rehashing the past. While today’s generation has certainly advanced in regards to performance enhancing drugs, performance without such drugs has not changed nearly as much as many believe.

As you study strength athletes from previous generations, you’ll realize that some of the best lessons have already been taught. Plenty can be learned from those who came before us.

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“The final goal of physical education is to make strong beings. In the purely physical sense, the Natural Method promotes the qualities of organic resistance, muscularity and speed, towards being able to walk, run, jump, move on all fours, to climb, to keep balance, to throw, lift, defend yourself, and to swim.” – Georges Hébert

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7 comments:

  1. “organic resistance” interesting. That little ditty will inspire the next Matt Furey with the latest in “organic resistance” training for the low cost of 475.oo.

  2. Interesting how he says that lifting heavy weights make you stiff. I see his point. I really like the points system for different exercises so you can see how fit you are, but I score less than zero on most of them!!!

  3. “Lifting heavy weights make you stiff.” Sorry, but in the year 2013 that is laughable. There was a nationally ranked American lifter named Fred Lowe who competed back in the Seventies and he would perform multiple back flips. Even the Eighties bodybuilder Tom Platz with his ginormous thighs was capable of performing splits. Sure, some of the behemoths in the bodybuilding world of 2013 certainly can’t be that flexible when you have arms as big as a healthy man’s thighs, but not many people look or can look like that even with the benefit of steroids. IF you follow a well rounded routine and don’t neglect the other aspects of fitness like conditioning, stretching, and maybe even add in some sports like basketball, swimming, etc., lifting heavy shouldn’t effect your flexibility that much if at all.

  4. Still his wisdom is valid and I personally found this very interesting. I totally agree that so much can be learned from those who came before us.

  5. @ Eric :
    “IF you follow a well rounded routine and don’t neglect the other aspects of fitness like conditioning, stretching, and maybe even add in some sports like basketball, swimming, etc.,”

    You said it all. In other words, lifting heavy actually tends to affect your flexibility. Seems to me that you need to work extra to compensate and prevent yourself from being stiff.

  6. @Seamus: No you do not.

    You do not loose flexibility through a good training program, you gain it. Focusing heavily on maximal strength between 1-3rm might hamper speed, but if you train explosively and do squats and deadlifts, as an example, you will likely be more flexible than many people around. You will also jumpm pretty high.

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