Mike Tyson’s Words of Wisdom

It has been over 25 years since Mike Tyson debuted as a professional boxer in 1985. I still remember how excited I’d be to watch him as a youngster. The day couldn’t pass fast enough as we waited for the Tyson fight to begin. His sheer power and aggressiveness captivated fans from around the world.

Looking back on his career, many are quick to comment on physical attributes such as his knockout power and speed. What many fail to realize however is that Tyson was an extremely intelligent fighter. He was a student of the game. Yes, he was physically gifted and skilled, but he also was a master of mind games in and out of the ring. The video below provides a brief demonstration and example.

“They lost the fight before they even got hit.” – Mike Tyson

Additional words of wisdom can be found in the following clip as well.

If you are an aspiring fighter, I highly recommend taking a few minutes to listen to Tyson’s words of wisdom. In many ways, Tyson is the product of the legendary Cus D’Amato. When Tyson speaks about achieving greatness, much of what he says and believes was first instilled in him by Cus.

“It all comes down to dedication and consistency. They have to want it…” – Mike Tyson

 

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14 comments:

  1. Ross, how do you think Mike developed that level of confidence in his physical prowess? Just looking at the way he throws punches, you can tell he isn’t afraid, isn’t holding anything back.

    I see the way he lays everything on, and it makes me just a little ashamed of myself. For all those times I have “looked down” like the fighter facing Tyson in the first video, instead of facing an oncoming challenge with focused determination.

  2. This was great. I always thought Mr Tyson was too sharp in the smarts department. But as these videos show, his wisdom and knowledge of self is AWESOME. Someting we all could take note of.

  3. Ross, how do you think Mike developed that level of confidence in his physical prowess? Just looking at the way he throws punches, you can tell he isn’t afraid, isn’t holding anything back.

    I see the way he lays everything on, and it makes me just a little ashamed of myself. For all those times I have “looked down” like the fighter facing Tyson in the first video, instead of facing an oncoming challenge with focused determination.

    Would love to hear some insight from Ross on this too

  4. I think it would be quite an education to see a 1980s Tyson training day start to finish. It’s one thing to see snippets of him working, but to witness the full capacity he’d have put forward across just one day would be inspiring and, of course, totally humbling.

    And here’s a guy who pushed his mind and body to places few, if any, have ever gone to. A man who goes to these places (I assume, I don’t know) must know himself intricately. You hear him talk about how his inner dialogue changed the closer he got to the ring. He was so tuned in. But then you get all the erratic behavior in the 90s and beyond. He’s a fascinating, paradoxical dude.

  5. The 1st vid was my favorite part of the film.
    It’s an absolute clinic in visualization and conditioning one’s mind for success.

    Keith M & Jeremy P, I always enjoy Ross’s take and would love to hear his opinion, too.

    I’m assuming you’ve not seen “Tyson.” In it he describes how Cus would tell Mike he was stupendous, magnificent, the best, the HWCotW…
    Mike says that it took a while for a hustler, a criminal from nowhere to believe this old white guy but eventually even HE started to believe all the positive, uplifting affirmations Cus was instilling in him (Mike).

    The 1st vid is Mike doing it to himself.

    Cus must have believed:
    “Treat a man as he appears to be, and you make him worse. But treat a man as if he were what he potentially could be, and you make him what he should be. ”
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    It is a classic demonstration of the “Pygmalion Effect.”

    Do watch the movie. It is very, very good.

    Thoughts, Ross?

    -Bill

  6. I really like Mike’s definition of discipline.
    “Doing what you hate to do but nonetheless doing it like you love it.”

  7. I loved watching Mike Tyson fight , he was great , awesome.
    He was dynamic , the way he slipped the opponent , hit him in the left ribs , came up for the hook , worked everytime.
    I loved the way he said he fought to win , other fighters jabbed , jabbed , but he fought to win.
    He had presence , he had charisma.

  8. I listened to something very similar to the first clip before my last mma fight and I use it as part of my mental prep for fights. I think these mike Tyson clips are going on my Ipod and will replace my current play list of pre fight mental conditioners.

    I absolutely love Iron Mike’s wisdom, in fact the things i have learnt from his “mental game” have been more important to me then any physical or technical prowess I may hope to pick up from watching his fights or training.

    Thanks Ross, keep up the great work.

  9. I think what is even more interesting is how Tyson used his fear to motivate him to train hard to win. I think in the Buster Douglas fight he lost partly because he was not afraid of Douglas. I think Tyson has a lot of fear for his opponent, that is why he is so vicious. Ross, I would also love to hear your take on this!

  10. The lamestream media/corporate mind control for the masses always puts Iron Mike down but, he was truly a combat genius. I’ve always thought he was the best to ever step into the ring. If we could assemble all the best fighters in the WOrld on their best day all at once my money would be on Iron Mike-it’s hard to be aggression, conditioning, brutality, and skull skulduggery all wrapped into one package.

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