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Farms For The Future

Following two recent posts on food production (The Future of Food and Food, Inc.), I’ve received several emails with additional viewing suggestions.  There have also been comments posted within each of the original entries.

Farms for the Future has been mentioned a few times, so I figured it would be worthwhile to embed the full video within the blog.

Please enable Javascript and Flash to view this Viddler video.

For those interested, the video is also available on Youtube.  Part I can be found here.

And please note that I’m not posting these videos to scare anyone, but I do think it is important to know how and where our food is produced.

In terms of nutritional strategies and ideas, I am all for simplicity.  As stated within a past entry:

My nutritional strategy is very simple. I eat real food (ex. fruits, veggies, fish, meat, etc.) when I’m hungry, and I don’t eat any artificial and/or processed junk. That’s it. I have better things to do with my time than counting how much of this or that nutrient has been consumed in this or that meal. My ancestors did pretty well without calculating zones and nutrient ratios on the abacus, so I see no reason to change. I never get sick, recover quickly from training, and feel good throughout the day. If it isn’t broken, I see no reason to fix it. Find what works for you. That’s the best nutritional advice I ever heard, so now I’m giving it to you.

In the words of Confucius,

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.”

Amazingly, despite originating a few thousand years ago, the statement above is still as true as ever.

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9 comments

9 Comments so far

  1. wavehand December 14th, 2009 2:32 am

    Wow. I want to learn more about this. My little back yard garden supplied about 40% of my food this summer. After watching this I would love to find a place with some land and use similar gardening methods as shown in this movie.
    Other key points, it seems many people eat three meals a meal (not a typo). I have been moving toward less meat and dairy, and smaller portions of food. The three meals per meal statement comes from thinking back to how I was eating a couple years ago and most of my life before that. I marvel at how little food I need compared to what I was raised to believe. Probably still eating more than the Spartans, but “keeping them hungry” didn’t hurt their physical prowess any so maybe I can learn to eat even less. Truth be told, I am tougher now with less food in my diet. This is great information, thanks Ross, and thanks Paul M.

  2. Jeremy December 15th, 2009 7:55 am

    My nutritional strategy is very simple. I eat real food (ex. fruits, veggies, fish, meat, etc.) when I’m hungry, and I don’t eat any artificial and/or processed junk. That’s it. I have better things to do with my time than counting how much of this or that nutrient has been consumed in this or that meal. My ancestors did pretty well without calculating zones and nutrient ratios on the abacus, so I see no reason to change. I never get sick, recover quickly from training, and feel good throughout the day. If it isn’t broken, I see no reason to fix it. Find what works for you. That’s the best nutritional advice I ever heard, so now I’m giving it to you.

    I tend to agree with the advice above when it’s put into the right context e.g for someone who’s been into the healthy living scene for more than 5 minutes. But I don’t agree with it as a strategy for the average Joe.

    I don’t believe that advancement in any area of life comes with sudden leaps such as in stage theory. I think the edges are gradually contrasted into the next level. In other words novices will rarely go from eating fat with fries to eating pure food direct from the source.

    People have been eating crap since Adam and will continue to do so all the way to Armageddon, it’s the cultural norm. Just my view but for anyone making the leap, to at the very least leading a healthier life, they need to have a general idea of what food is made of. If they come across a bit of advice that goes along the lines; ‘you need x amount of protein per kg of bodyweight’ then average Joe is f****d straight away. I think of it like training wheels, use them to map the nutritional landscape then thrown them away when the experience comes.

  3. Javier December 15th, 2009 1:13 pm

    Ross, thanks for posting these recent videos. I particularly enjoyed Food, Inc. I must also say that I’m in agreement with simplicity in regards to dietary advice. I have lost 66 pounds in the last year and a half. In that time, I also ran my first half marathon. I have no idea how many calories I eat, but I do know that I am in the best shape of my life. The transition from fat to fit didn’t involve rocket science. We as people know what is good vs. bad. I always did, the difference is that I now care, before I didn’t.

    I used to eat sugary cereal for breakfast. I now eat eggs or steel cut oats along with a bowl of fresh fruit. I to eat fast food for lunch. I now cook in advance or bring leftovers to work. I had a bowl of chili yesterday and have turkey soup waiting for me today. I used to bring sweets for snacks, but now bring fresh fruit, sliced vegetables, and assorted nuts. I used to eat pizza for dinner. I knew it wasn’t healthy, but I didn’t care. I now cook balanced meals. I learned how to cook and actually enjoy the taste of the healthy foods. Tonight I am having chicken marsala with fresh spinach on the side.

    Encourage people to cook real, healthy foods, eating balanced meals in moderation. Everything else then falls into place, assuming you care to improve. Your blog is one of three or four that has really helped me, so thank you.

    JV

  4. Ulfhjart December 16th, 2009 1:21 am

    Ross, I’m a student of Biodiversity and Conservation in South Australia. I must say that I’m heartened to see an increase of this sort of peer education by average people. The terrifying thing for me has been the overwhelming apathy which typically greets the expert advice one sees on the news. Education is key to changing our behaviours as it is the ignorance (promoted, as we know, by the corporations out for profits at all costs) of the damage done by our societies that is the biggest cause for the delay in these necessary changes.
    I was greatly impressed by you upon reading Never Gymless, lent to me by a friend. Your sensible attitude to just getting on with it (whatever “it” may be) is sorely lacking in western society and I have been encouraging others to look at your works. Your website continues to keep you high in my regard as I discover the depth of not only your sensibility but that there are more people with this attitude around than I had thought.
    So, from the other side of the world, I say thankyou for sharing what you have worked hard to learn on many topics and thankyou for your part in educating those around you.
    I know very little about what books there are available in America on the topic of sustainability, however, John Seymour and Bill Mollison are two fantastic authors of books on self-sufficiency and permaculture.
    I’ll get off my soapbox now and get back to my workout…
    Ulfhjart

  5. Simon December 17th, 2009 9:19 pm

    Hi Ross!

    I always moved in so many ways by postings like this one. I love videos on sustainable technologies that enable us to keep on existing as a civilization.

    However, I have to think about the practicability of an approach like this – can forest gardens and permaculture work everywhere we use to live – or will we have to once accept that there are planes where human life is unable to sustain unless supported by artificial means? Regardless, there are ways for the future. A future without grains, as it seems. I won’t miss them all too much :)

    Keep on the good work!

    All the Best
    Simon

  6. T Vitiello January 19th, 2010 12:49 pm

    It’s amazing that we are what we eat. If we put good raw fruits and vegetables into our system, then we will feel good. It’s as easy as that.

  7. T Vitiello February 3rd, 2010 11:33 am

    I am trying to move away from processed foods and eat more raw and organic foods.

  8. Chet Payne June 14th, 2010 3:16 pm

    This is extremely informative!

  9. Justin June 16th, 2012 6:05 pm

    I see this shit all the time in the hospital. People wonder why they are sick all the time or got heart disease and diabetes and many other issues is honestly a lack of exercise and bad eating habits mainly too much sugar. I believe virtually all health disorders can be prevented with eating whole organic foods from your own garden and hunting and fishing for your foo plus exercising everyday and eating only till your content. Its that simple.

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