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Wilma Rudolph

Below is a powerful video which chronicles the tremendous accomplishments of Wilma Rudolph.  The link was posted as a comment to my last entry (thanks Josh), but deserves its own place in the inspirational category of this blog.

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There was a time in Rudolph’s life when doctors told her she would never walk again.  Not only did she prove them wrong, she eventually went on to win three gold medals in the 1960 Olympic games.

A quote from Rudolph later in her life explains how and why she refused to believe the dismal outlook suggested by doctors.

“I believe in me more than anything in this world.”

This single line is as powerful as any.  Believing in yourself, even if that means spitting in the face of conventional wisdom, is perhaps the greatest secret to success. Unfortunately, it isn’t always easy to get others to follow this simple advice. You cannot fake belief. It must be real.

Perhaps seeing what those such as Wilma Rudolph have been able to achieve can help others learn to believe in themselves.

From a personal standpoint, if I had listened to what others told me years ago, I wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing now, and I wouldn’t have achieved a fraction of what I’ve been able to accomplish at this point in my life.  Every day offers an opportunity to improve.   The opportunities don’t fall out of the sky however.  You need to get up and make it happen.

Believing in yourself is an absolute necessity if you hope to uncover opportunities that are currently hiding.  Without true belief in yourself, you’ll never go where you need to go to unlock your true potential.

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1 comment

1 Comment so far

  1. Dennis April 21st, 2009 7:46 am

    There’s a similarly inspiring story about the great American miler Glenn Cunningham. His legs were badly burned in a school fire when he a kid, to the point where doctors even recommended amputating them. They thought he’d never even walk normally, but he went on to become one of the great milers of his generation, eventually setting a world record. I don’t know if there are any nifty videos of him out in cyberspace, but you can at least read a bit more about him here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenn_Cunningham_(runner) and here (http://www.wanttoknow.info/050702powerofdetermination).

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